Geological and Geochemical Assessment Report on the Star Property, Central British Columbia

Cariboo Mining Division, Central British Columbia

Tautri Creek/Clisbako River Map Sheets (NTS 093B/11&12)

Latitude 52°, 39’N, Longitude 123°, 30.5’W

Owned by:

David St. Clair Dunn, P.Geo

331 East 8th Street

North Vancouver, B.C., Canada V7L 1Z2

Operated by:

Squire Mining Ltd.

Suite 404, 815 Hornby Street

Vancouver, B.C., Canada V6Z 2E6

 Prepared by:

Andrew Wilkins, BSc, PGeo

Lithos Geological Inc.

8328 Ski Jump Rise

Whistler, B.C., Canada V0N 1B9

November 2, 2015

Summary

This report documents the work of a three person mineral exploration crew on the Star Property carried out from the 1st to the 12th of July, 2015.

The Star Property is situated on the Chilcoltin Plateau of central British Columbia south of the town of Nazko. The property falls within the Intermontane belt, where the basement is composed of accreted Mesozoic terrains, including the prospective Stikine oceanic volcanic arc. Cretaceous to Eocene continental arc volcanic packages overly the basement and are prospective for epithermal deposits. The property is centred on an areomagnetic total field low that is interpreted to represent either a felsic intrusive centre or volcanics of the Eocene Ootsa Lake Group

Minimal exploration has occurred in the area due to a lack of outcrop, coverage by Neocene Chilcotin basalt, Eocene Endako basalt and glacial sediments from the Fraser glaciation of Late Wisconsin age. Mineralization is known to exist in the area and includes the epithermal gold and silver Baez and Clisbako showings 37 kilometres to the northwest and the Bob showing 30 kilometres to the north.

To date, prospecting and mapping of the few outcrops on the property has not resulted in the discovery of any mineralized showings or significant alteration, however prospective felsic volcanic rocks were found. These are believed to be part of the Eocene Clisbako volcanic assemblage which occurs to the west and is part of the Ootsa Lake Group.

A program that included grid MMITM soil geochemistry was initiated on the property. Eight lines, 800 metres long, 400 metres apart and at 50 metre sample spacing were proposed for the property. To date, three of these lines have been completed. Numerous anomalies have been identified including multi-element silver-lead-zinc-cadmium anomalies.

Compiling historic data identified a gold anomaly in one of the previously sampled streams. . The detection limit for the assay technique was high (2 ppm Au), so a more accurate assay technique is recommended to confirm the presence of this anomaly.

Due to the encouraging results, completion of the MMITM soil geochemistry grid, as well as more detailed soil sampling around identified anomalies is warranted on the property. Trenching of significant anomalies is recommended after completion of the MMITM sampling program. Re-sampling of the 2011 stream sediment samples using the more accurate ICP-MS and fire assay for gold techniques is also recommended.

Table of Contents

1       Introduction.. 1

1.1         Location and Access. 1

1.2         Physiography and Climate. 2

1.3         Claim Status. 2

1.4         History and Targets. 2

2       Current Exploration Program… 5

2.1         Soil Geochemistry (MMITM) 5

2.2         Mapping. 6

2.3         Rock Sampling. 6

2.4         Stream Sediment Silt Sampling. 6

3       Geology. 6

3.1         Regional Geology. 6

3.2         Property Geology, Alteration and Rock Geochemistry. 7

4       Stream Sediment Sample Results. 9

5       MMI Soil Sample Results. 9

6       Discussion.. 11

7       Recommendations. 11

8       Statement of Expenditures. 12

9       References. 13

10     Statement of Qualifications. 15

11     Appendixes. 16

11.1       Appendix A – MMI Soil Sample Locations and Geochemistry.

11.2       Appendix B – Rock Sample Locations and Descriptions.

11.3       Appendix C – Rock Geochemistry.

11.4       Appendix D – Stream Sediment Silt Sample Locations and Geochemistry.

11.5       Appendix E – Assay Certificates.

List of Tables

Table 1 – Star Property Claim Status. 2

List of Figures

Figure 1 – Location Map. 1

Figure 2 – Tenure Map. 3

Figure 3 – Regional Geology. 8

Figure 4 – Geology on top of Areomagnetic Total Field. 10

List of Maps in back of the report

Map 1 – Geology

Map 2 – Sample Locations

Map 3 – Stream Sediment Geochemistry for Gold

Map 4 – Stream Sediment and Rock Geochemistry for Copper

Map 5 – Stream Sediment and Rock Geochemistry for Molybdenum

Map 6 – Stream Sediment Geochemistry for Mercury

Map 7 – MMI Soil Geochemistry for Silver

Map 8 – MMI Soil Geochemistry for Gold

Map 9 – MMI Soil Geochemistry for Cadmium

Map 10 – MMI Soil Geochemistry for Copper

Map 11 – MMI Soil Geochemistry for Lead

Map 12 – MMI Soil Geochemistry for Zinc

 

1          Introduction

1.1        Location and Access

The Star Property is situated in central British Columbia, approximately 32 km south of the town of Nazko, BC and 80 kilometers west of Quesnel, BC.   The property is centered at approximately 52°, 39′ north latitude and 123°, 30.5′ west longitude (Figure 1, and 2) within the Cariboo Mining Division. Access to the property from Quesnel is west along the paved Nazko Road for 75 kilometers and then south along the gravel Honolulu and Clisbako Mouth Forest Service Roads. Multiple logging roads

CaptureFigure 1 – Location Map

provide access to all sides of the property. These roads branch off from both the well maintained Honolulu and Clisbako Mouth Forest Service Roads. The current condition of the logging roads is variable with many of them overgrown or deactivated.   Some are accessible with a 4×4, but many are only passible on foot or with an ATV. The crew stayed in a camp at the Honolulu Indian Head recreation site and commuted about 25 kilometres to the property each day.

1.2        Physiography and Climate

The Star Property is located in the Chilcotin Plateau of British Columbia. The property consists of a north south trending ridge sloping gently to the Nazko River to the east and Clisbako River to the west. Elevations range from a low of 1150 metres on the southeast margin of the claims to a high of 1,543 metres in the centre of the claims.

The biogeoclimatic ecological zones consist of sub-boreal pine spruce below 1300 meters elevation and Montane Spruce at higher elevation. The property consists of approximately 40% mature stands of spruce and pine and 60% of clear cuts with immature pine and spruce. Much of the mature pine is standing dead from the pine beetle infestation.

Most of the claims are covered by a veneer of glacial till anywhere from 1 to 10 metres thick and averaging about 2 metres. Outcrop is scarce and is confined to the tops of prominent knobs and disturbed areas such as road cuts, ditches and burrow pits from past logging operations.

The climate is typical of the northern interior with summer temperatures ranging from 15°C to 25°C and winter temperatures ranging from -20°C to -10°C. The region receives a moderate amount of precipitation with much of it falling as snow in the winter months.

1.3        Claim Status

The Star Property consists of 6 contiguous mineral claims totalling 2,942.00 hectares. The registered owner of the claims is David St. Clair Dunn. The property is currently under option to Squire Mining Ltd.

Table 1 – Star Property Claim Status

Tenure No. Name Owner Issue Date Expiry Date New Expiry Date Area (hectares)
854085 Star 1 David St. C. Dunn 9-May-11 1-Oct-15 1-Oct-16 490.11
854087 Star 2 David St. C. Dunn 9-May-11 1-Oct-15 1-Oct-16 490.33
854088 Star 3 David St. C. Dunn 9-May-11 1-Oct-15 1-Oct-16 490.33
854090 Star 4 David St. C. Dunn 9-May-11 1-Oct-15 1-Oct-16 490.11
904413 Star 5 David St. C. Dunn 3-Oct-11 3-Oct-15 3-Oct-16 490.56
904414 Star 6 David St. C. Dunn 3-Oct-11 3-Oct-15 3-Oct-16 490.56
Total 2942.00

1.4        History and Targets

The region surrounding the Star Property hosts several significant epithermal and porphyry deposits hosted within either the Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic accreted island arc assemblages of the Quesnel

Capture1Figure 2 – Tenure Map

terrane or the continental arc assemblages of the late Eocene stratigraphy. These include the Blackwater epithermal Au-Ag deposit with approximately 270 million grams gold (9.5 million oz. contained Au, total measured and inferred, Christie et al., 2014) 95 kilometres to the northwest. Even though the area has high exploration potential, only limited exploration activity has occurred due to the extensive cover that includes basalt from the Eocene Endako Group and Neogene Chilcotin Group as well as glacial till and associated deposits from the Fraser glaciation of Late Wisconsin age.

The Star Property is located in areas covered by government initiated regional programs including Geoscience BC’s QUEST and TREK Projects.

Geoscience BC’s QUEST Project, initiated in 2007, was a program of regional geochemical and geophysical surveys designed to attract the mineral exploration industry to an under-explored region of British Columbia between Williams Lake and Mackenzie. The Quesnel Terrane has good potential for copper and gold porphyry deposits. The QUEST Project was focused on Quesnel Terrane that is covered by a thick layer of sand and gravel left behind by the Fraser glaciation.

Geoscience BC’s TREK (Targeting Resources for Exploration and Knowledge) Project was initiated in 2013, and the southeastern portion of the project covers the Star Property. The project is centred on the Blackwater Davidson deposit and includes new airborne geophysics; new stream, lake, soil and till geochemical sampling; and new geological mapping and mineral deposit studies.

The area in the immediate vicinity of the Star Property has no records of any previous mineral exploration prior to David St. Clair Dunn acquiring the claims in 2011.

The claims were staked to cover the centre of a prominent total field magnetic low identified in the Geological Survey of Canada’s areomagnetic survey and is postulated to be a manifestation of a near surface felsic intrusive centre. The property is also believed to lie along a major northwest trending structure that includes the Blackwater epithermal Au-Ag deposit, as well as the Capoose and Windfall prospects. Regional stream sediment geochemistry from the Quest program has identified six streams with gold, mercury and antimony anomalies higher than the 70th percentile and two streams with mercury anomalies higher than the 95th percentile.

Since acquiring the claims, the owner has conducted three separate small exploration programs in 2011, 2013 and 2014. The first program in 2011 consisted of prospecting and stream sediment sampling to attempt to define areas with anomalous gold content. Most logging roads were prospected for new outcrop. Eight pan concentrate samples and fifteen silt samples were taken during this program.

The second program in 2013 consisted of stream sediment sampling to test previously untested areas of the property and a soil geochemical orientation survey attempting to define areas with anomalous gold content and to compare the efficacy of standard “B” horizon soil samples versus Mobile Metal Ion (MMITM) samples. Two paired pan concentrate and stream sediment silt samples and one single stream sediment silt sample were taken on three drainages in the southwest quadrant of the property. Ten paired “B” horizon soil and MMITM samples were taken at 50 metre intervals along a southeast trending line in the north central part of the property.

The third program in 2014 consisted of soil sampling the centre of the claims to test the areomagnetic low geophysical anomaly. A total of 137 “B” horizon soil samples were taken at 50 metre intervals on six one kilometer east-west lines. The two clear cuts in the north central part of the property and the area of the soil geochemical grid were prospected, totaling about 2.5 square kilometres.

2          Current Exploration Program

Lithos Geological Inc. managed the exploration program for Squire Mining Ltd. The field crew consisted of one geologist and two samplers. The project consisted of predominately grid soil sampling, as well as minor prospecting, geologic mapping, stream sediment silt sampling and rock sampling. The field program ran from July 1 to July 12, 2015.

2.1        Soil Geochemistry (MMITM)

Due to the extensive glacial till coverage and lack of outcrop in the area, the Mobile Metal Ion (MMITM) soil sampling technique was used. MMITM is propriety technology developed by SGS Mineral Services. MMITM measures metal ions that are released from mineralized material and travel upward to unconsolidated surface materials such soil, till and sand. Through the use of specific soil sampling protocols, special chemical ligands and sensitive ICP-MS instrumentation, SGS is able to measure these ions. SGS claims there are many benefits of using this technology including the following;

  • Few false anomalies
  • Focused, sharp anomalies
  • Excellent repeatability
  • Definition of metal zones and associations
  • Detection of deeply buried mineralization
  • Low background values (low noise)
  • Low limits of detection

Soil sampling was conducted by a two man soil sampling team. A GPS soil sampling grid was laid out at 400 metre line spacing and 50 metre sample spacing. The grid was uploaded to a Garmin Oregon GPS. Samplers navigated to the GPS location and updated the coordinates where the actual sample was taken. Using a tree planter steel shovel and a geo-tool, samplers excavated a hole to access the soil. The organic/inorganic soil interface was identified and then a channel sample of the soil from 10 cm to 25 cm below the interface was collected. Approximately 300 grams of soil was collected in medium sized plastic freezer bags with the sample number marked on each bag. A total of 221 soil samples were collected. Soil samples were delivered in person to the SGS Mineral Service’s lab in Burnaby, BC for analysis. At SGS, a weak extraction using a multicomponent solution is used to release the mobile ions from the samples. The ions are measured using a high sensitivity inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). A total of 53 elements were analysed. Sample locations and results are listed in Appendix A. Assay certificates are presented in Appendix E. Sample locations are plotted on map 2 in the back of the report. MMITM soil geochemistry results for silver, gold, cadmium, copper, lead and zinc are plotted on maps 7 to 12 in the back of the report.

2.2        Mapping

The geologist on the project walked and mapped most of the old logging roads in the area. A Garmin Oregon GPS was used to create waypoints for field note observations and mapping. Outcrop geology, interpretative geology, rock sample locations and waypoints were added to an ArcGIS geodatabase and maps were generated using ESRI ArcGIS 10.1 and Target Geochemistry for ArcGIS software. The UTM projection (NAD83 Zone 10) is used for all mapping and sampling locations. The geology is plotted on map 1 in the back of the report.

2.3        Rock Sampling

Rock samples were collected from outcrop or sub-crop. The samples were placed in individual plastic bags with a sample tag and then sealed with a zap strap. In total 5 rock samples were collected from the property in 2015 and 1 sample from 2014. GPS locations and rock sample descriptions were recorded for all samples. Rock samples were delivered in person to the SGS Mineral Services lab in Burnaby, BC for analysis. Samples were weighed and then crushed until 75% of the sample passes through a 2mm sieve. A 250 gram split is then pulverized until 85% of the sample passes through a 75 micron sieve. A split of 50 grams is then dissolved in a mixture of four acids for a near total digestion and then analysed with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). A total of 49 elements were analysed. Rock sample descriptions and locations are listed in Appendix B. Rock geochemistry is listed in Appendix C. Assay certificates are located in Appendix E. Rock sample locations are plotted on map 2. Rock geochemistry for copper and molybdenum are plotted on maps 4 and 5 respectively. All maps are in the back of the report.

2.4        Stream Sediment Silt Sampling

A total of 12 stream sediment silt samples were collected. Most of the streams draining the property were rather small. Stream sediment silt samples were collected from the active part of the creek bed or from moss mats on the edge of the creek where silt size material was trapped. Approximately 500 grams of material was collected at each sample site and placed in kraft bags. GPS locations were recorded for all samples. Stream sediment samples were delivered in person to the SGS Mineral Services lab in Burnaby, BC for analysis. Samples were weighed and dried and then dissolved in an aqua regia digestion. They were then analysed with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). A total of 36 elements were analysed. Sample locations and results are listed in Appendix D. Assay certificates are located in Appendix E. Stream sediment geochemistry for gold, copper, molybdenum and mercury are plotted on maps 3 to 6 respectively in the back of the report.

3          Geology

3.1        Regional Geology

The regional geology is taken from publications related to the TREK program which is centred on the Blackwater Davidson deposit and includes the Star Project area.

British Columbia is dominantly composed of tectonic blocks that were accreted onto the western margin of the ancestral North America continent through the Mesozoic. Much of central BC is underlain by the Intermontane terrane, which is composed of the amalgamated Stikine, Cache Creek and Quesnel terranes (Monger and Price, 2002). The Stikine and Quesnel terranes formed as oceanic island volcanic arcs, with similar compositions and stratigraphy. The two terranes may have been part of the same Late Triassic arc that enclosed the Cache Creek terrane during accretion on to the continental margin (Mihalynuk et al., 1994). The Mesozoic volcano-sedimentary packages of Stikinia form the basement rocks in the area of the TREK project and the Star claims and are composed of Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic arc volcanic rocks and their erosional products. These are overlain by Middle to Upper Jurassic marine to non-marine sedimentary stratigraphy of the Bowser Lake Group, including the Ashman Formation (Tipper and Richards, 1976; Diakow et al., 1997; Riddell, 2011). A significant unconformity, interpreted as a period of uplift and deformation, marks the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (Tipper and Richards, 1976). This unconformity is overlain by similar marine to non-marine strata of the Lower Cretaceous Skeena Group (Tipper and Richards, 1976; Riddell, 2011. Post deformation, continental margin arcs were unconformably deposited episodically during the Late Cretaceous to the Eocene and include felsic to intermediate continental arc related volcanic rocks of the Late Cretaceous Kasalka Group (Diakow et al., 1997) and Eocene volcanic strata of the Ootsa Lake Group and Endako Group. The Ootsa Lake Group is composed predominantly of rhyolite to dacite flows and minor associated volcanoclastic rocks. The Endako Group is composed of andesitic to basaltic flows and conformably overlies the Ootsa Lake Group; however age dating has indicated that the Endako Group is, at least in part, coeval with the Ootsa Lake Group (Grainger et al., 2001). The tectonic setting for Eocene volcanism in this region is northwest-directed extension associated with movement on faults with dextral trans-tensional offsets (Struik, 1993; Struik and MacIntyre, 2001). The Chilcotin Group is a sequence of Neogene flood basalts that cover much of south-central BC (Bevier, 1983). They are estimated to cover roughly 30,000 km2 of southcentral BC and unconformably overlie Eocene and older rocks. Exposures of the Chilcotin Group generally occur in areas of low topography, with older units occupying adjacent higher topography, suggesting that it was deposited within paleo valleys (Mihalynuk, 2007). The flood basalts rarely exceed 50 m in thickness.

3.2        Property Geology, Alteration and Rock Geochemistry

Map 1 is the property geology map and is located in the back of the report.

Most of the Star Property is covered by glacial till. Sub-crop and outcrop is found on ridge tops and in road cuts.

In 1993, the map area immediately west of the claims was mapped by Metcalf et al. as part of the (1991-1995) Canada – British Columbia Agreement on Mineral Development. The purpose was to determine the stratigraphic succession and petrologic relationships of the Early Tertiary felsic volcanic rocks which host epithermal mineralization discovered on the Baez and Clisbako claim groups to the west of the Star claims. Mapping in 2015 has discovered numerous outcrops on the west and south side of the claims

Capture3Figure 3 – Regional Geology

which are comparable to the intermediate to felsic volcanic rocks identified west of the property that has been referred to as the Eocene Clisbako volcanic assemblage (Metcalf, 1993). This assemblage is considered to be part of the Ootsa Lake Group. Weakly to moderately porphyritic intermediate lavas and related breccia, containing plagioclase and/or pyroxene phenocrysts as well as black glassy dacitic flows and breccia have been found in the southwest portion of the claims. These units are believed to be associated with the areomagnetic total field lows identified in the GSC open file # 2785. Figure 4 shows the interpreted geology on top of the areomagnetic total field map.

The Ootsa Lake Group rocks have been capped by basalt and andesite of the Eocene Endako Group. The basalts have been found mostly in the higher elevations of property and consist of massive, magnetic, variably amygdaloidal dark grey basalt.

The Neogene Chilcotin flood basalts are not believed to outcrop on the property however they do outcrop to both the north and south of the claims. They are generally found in areas of low topography.

To the east of the claims, massive pale coloured sandstones have been mapped. These are believed to belong to the Lower Cretaceous Skeena Group and are the result of erosion by the Nazko River exposing the older rocks below the Eocene stratigraphy.

No significant alteration was observed on the property. Assays of sampled outcrop did not return any values of significance.

4          Stream Sediment Sample Results

Stream sediment silt samples from the 2011 program were analysed using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). Samples from the 2013 and 2015 program as well as the re-analysed QUEST program were analysed using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS technique has much lower detection limits than the ICP-ES technique. For this reason, it is difficult to compare the results of the 2011 program with the results of 2013, 2015 and the QUEST program and possible anomalies from 2011 may have been overlooked. Of particular note is a reported 3 ppm gold sample draining the south part of the property from the 2011 program. The detection limit was 2 ppm (as opposed to 1 ppb for the QUEST data) so although the sample is just in detection range and quite possibly did not contain the reported 3000 ppb gold, it probably did contain anomalous gold and the creek should be resampled to determine the magnitude of the anomaly.

Weak copper and very weak molybdenum and mercury anomalies have been returned from samples draining the northeast portion of the claims.

5          MMI Soil Sample Results

Results from the 2013 and the 2015 programs were combined. Response ratios for each element were calculated. Results that are below detection limit were assigned a value of one half of the detection

Capture4Figure 4 – Geology on top of Areomagnetic Total Field

limit. The mean was then calculated for the lowest quartile (25%). This is then treated as the background for that particular element. For each sample the element assay is divided by the calculated background and then rounded to a whole number, this is referred to as the response ratio.

Numerous anomalies have been identified on the property including a multi-element lead-zinc-silver-cadmium anomaly centred on line 354N. These anomalies will need more detailed sampling around them before any size or trend can be determined. Response ratios of up to 216 for zinc, 114 for lead, 96 for cadmium, 21 for silver, 11 for copper and 6 for gold have been calculated.

6          Discussion

The Star Property is an early stage mining exploration program that is centred on a prominent areomagnetic low. Geologic mapping has confirmed the presence of highly prospective Eocene Ootsa Lake Group felsic volcanics and that the property is most likely part of the Clisbako volcanic assemblage as identified by Metcalf (1993). This complex hosts the epithermal mineralization at the Baez and Clisbako showings 37 kilometres to the northwest and is probably related to the mineralization at the Bob showing 30 kilometres to the north. The Ootsa Lake Group is related to continental margin magmatic arcs.

MMI soil geochemistry has identified some encouraging multi-element anomalies on the property. The questionable 3 ppm gold anomaly from a stream sediment silt sample needs confirmation with a more robust geochemical lab technique.

7          Recommendations

The following program is recommended;

  • Continuation of the MMITM soil sampling grid (5 more 800 metre lines, 400 metres apart at 50 metre sample spacing).
  • Increased MMITM soil sampling density around identified anomalies.
  • Trenching of anomalies with a small backhoe.
  • Re-sampling of streams from the 2011 program and analysis using the more robust multi-element aqua regia/ICP-MS and fire assay/ICP-MS for gold techniques.
  • Fire assay/ICP-MS for gold on 2015 silt samples.

8          Statement of Expenditures

 

Field Days Totals
Project Geologist 12 days @ $787.50 per day $9,450.00
Soil Samples 24 days @ $270.38 per day $6,489.00
$15,939.00
Office Prep and Reports
Project Geologist 70 hours @ $   78.75 per hour $5,512.50
$ 5,512.50
Geochemical Surveying
Rock samples 6 samples @ $   41.16 per sample $     246.96
Silt samples 12 samples @ $   25.31 per sample $     303.66
MMI soil samples 221 samples @ $   42.26 per sample $9,340.01
$   9,890.63
Transportation
Vehicle rental 3414 km @ $     0.68 per km $2,330.06
Fuel $     933.29
$   3,263.35
Accommodation and Food
Meals 36 days @ $   52.50 per day $1,890.00
Hotel $     492.62
Tent Trailer Rental 12 days @ $105.00  per day  $1,260.00
$ 3,642.62
Miscellaneous
Radio Rental $   235.20
Field consumables etc. $   550.00
$  785.20
TOTAL Expenditures           $39,033.30

 

9          References

Christie, G., Ignacy, L., Simpson, R.G., Horton, J. and Borntraeger, B. (2014): Blackwater Gold Project, British Columbia – NI 43-101 Technical Report on Feasibility Study

Clifford, A. and Hart, C.J.R. (2014): Targeting Resources through Exploration and Knowledge (TREK): Geoscience BC’s newest minerals project, Interior Plateau region, central British Columbia (NTS 093B, C, F, G); in Geoscience BC Summary of Activities 2013, Geoscience BC, Report 2014- 1

Diakow, L.J. and V.M. Levson (1997): Bedrock and surficial geology of the southern Nechako Plateau, central British Columbia; BC Ministry of Energy and Mines, BC Geological Survey, Geoscience Map 1997-2, scale 1:100 000

Dunn, D. St. Clair (2012); Report on 2011 Geochemical and Prospecting Programs on the Star Property, Star, Star 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 Claims, Cariboo Mining Division, British Columbia, NTS 93B 11/12, assessment report #AR32752 submitted to Mineral Titles Branch, Ministry of Energy and Mines, British Columbia

Dunn, D. St. Clair (2013): Report on 2013 Geochemical and Soil Orientation Programs on the Star Property, Star, Star 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 Claims, Cariboo Mining Division, British Columbia, assessment report #34430 submitted to Mineral Titles Branch, Ministry of Energy and Mines, British Columbia

Dunn, D. St. Clair (2014): Report on 2014 Soil Geochemical and Prospecting Programs on the Star Property, Star, Star 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 Claims, Cariboo Mining Division, British Columbia, assessment report submitted to Mineral Titles Branch, Ministry of Energy and Mines, British Columbia

Evenchick, C.A. (1991): Geometry, evolution and tectonic framework of the Skeena fold belt, north central British Columbia; Tectonics, v. 10

Grainger, N.C., Villeneuve, M.E., Heaman, L.M. and Anderson, R.G. (2001): New U-Pb and Ar/Ar isotopic age constraints on the timing of Eocene magmatism, Fort Fraser and Nechako River map areas, central British Columbia: Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, v. 38

Geological Survey of Canada (1995): Aeromagnetic Total Field Map, Open file # 2785

Jackaman, W. and Balfour, J.S. (2008): QUEST Project Geochemistry: Field Surveys and Data Reanalysis, Central British Columbia (parts of NTS 093A, B, G, H, J, K, N, O); in Geoscience BC Summary of Activities 2007, Geoscience BC, Report 2008-1

Massey, N.W.D., MacIntyre, D.G., Desjardins, P.J. and Cooney, R.T. (2005): Digital geology map of British Columbia: whole province; BC Ministry of Energy and Mines, BC Geological Survey, GeoFile 2005-1, scale 1:250 000

Metcalfe, P., Richards, T.A., Villeneuve, M.E., White, J.M. and Hickson, C.J. (1998): Physical and chemical volcanology of the Eocene Mount Clisbako volcano, central British Columbia; Interior Plateau Geoscience Project: Summary of Geological, Geochemical and Geophysical Studies, BC Ministry of Energy and Mines, BC Geological Survey, Paper 1997-2

MINFILE (2015): MINFILE BC mineral deposits data base; BC Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources

Monger, J. and Price, R. (2002): The Canadian Cordillera: geology and tectonic evolution; Canadian Society of Exploration Geophysicists Recorder v. 27, no. 2

Ostensoe, E.A. (2014): Technical Report on the Star Property, Cariboo Mining Division, Central British Columbia, Canada, National Instrument 43-101 Technical Report, SEDAR

Riddell, J. (2011): Lithostratigraphic and tectonic framework of Jurassic and Cretaceous Intermontane sedimentary basins of south-central British Columbia; Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, v. 48

Struik, L.C. and MacIntyre, D.G. (2000): Nechako NATMAP project overview, year five, central British Columbia; Geological Survey of Canada, Current Research 2000-A10

Struik, L.C. and MacIntyre, D.G. (2001): Introduction to the special issue of Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences: the Nechako NATMAP project of the central Canadian Cordillera; Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, v. 38

Tipper, H.W. and Richards, T.A. (1976): Jurassic stratigraphy and history of north-central British Columbia; Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 270

 

10     Statement of Qualifications

I, Andrew Wilkins, do hereby certify that:

  1. I am a graduate of the University of British Columbia with a Bachelor of Science Degree majoring in Geology, obtained in 1981.
  2. I have been employed within the mining industry since 1978, having worked in mineral exploration in Canada, Mexico and the United States.
  3. I am a member of the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of BC (#121825).
  4. I am a partner in Lithos Geological Inc.
  5. I supervised and worked on the Nazko Project in 2015 for Squire Mining Ltd.
  6. I am the author of this report entitled “Geological and Geochemical Assessment Report on the Star Property, Central British Columbia”.
  7. I believe the report accurately depicts the information available at the time of its writing.

Dated this 2nd day of November, 2015

Capture5

11     Appendixes

11.1   Appendix A – MMI Soil Sample Locations and Geochemistry

11.2   Appendix B – Rock Sample Locations and Descriptions

11.3  Appendix C – Rock Geochemistry

11.4   Appendix D – Stream Sediment Silt Sample Locations and Geochemistry

11.5   Appendix E – Assay Certificates